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Celebrate Black History Month with Nauticus!

The theme for Nauticus’ Black History Month Celebration is Afrofuturism: Black Scientists & Science Fiction.

What is Afrofuturism?
Afrofuturism is the merging of Black history and culture with science fiction, science, technology and art. It inspires us to reimagine the past and speculate about the future.

Throughout the month, Nauticus will celebrate all of the amazing Afrofuturism creators who have dared us to dream bigger and the Black environmental and sustainable scientists who were inspired by them.

Tune in to virtual events for all ages leading up to our big celebration weekend, February 26 – 28. Admission for all visitors discounted to $7.57 (plus tax)! Nauticus Members are free.

Capacity is limited to 30% and will be monitored. Online ticket purchases are strongly encouraged to guarantee entry. Masks are required for visitors ages 5+.

Virtual Program: Melt the Rainbow, For Families - Ages 5-12

Sunday, Feb. 21 | 10:30 AM
Instructor led program via Zoom 

Combine science, art, and upcycling with this colorful activity. Make your trash into treasure by experimenting with the melting and cooling of crayons to make your own inspirational poster in honor of Black History month!

Materials Needed: Canvas, unwrapped crayons, tape, and a hair dryer

Free program recommended for ages 5-12 but younger and older siblings are welcome to participate. This program is offered through Nauticus’ Curious Kids STEM-ulating Activities series. Register by Sat. Feb. 20th to guarantee your spot. 

 

Virtual Program: Afrofuturism; Inspiring Us to Dream Bigger

Tuesday, Feb. 23 | 3:30 PM
Webinar via Zoom & Facebook Live

Afrofuturism —the merging of Black history and culture with science fiction, science, technology and art— inspires us to reimagine the past and speculate about the future. This speculation has long had an environmental spin.

How has this cultural genre inspired scientists and creatives to dream bigger and imagine themselves limitless? Looking back, we see Afrofuturism powerhouses like Octavia Butler (Parable of a Sower) who wrote about a speculated year 2020 that sounds eerily like our current reality, a world affected by climate change and pollution. Afrofuturism authors can make these startling predictions because they do not guess about the future; they pay attention to the present and try and look beyond.

Join us in an informal discussion with Afrofuturism creators inspired by those who came before:

Panelists: Ytasha Womack (Author of Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture, Artist & Director), Kemi Layeni (Local artist & Founder of Blooming While Black), Cheyney McKnight (Artist, Educator & Founder of Not Your Momma’s History).

Meet the Panelists — >

 

 

 

Ytasha Womack

Ytasha L. Womack is an award-winning author, filmmaker, independent scholar, and dance therapist. She is a leading expert on Afrofuturism, the imagination and its applications and frequently lectures on the subject across the world. Ytasha was honored among DesignHub’s 40 Under 40 designers for social good and innovation in 2017 and listed as a Filmmaker to Watch in The Chicago Tribune. Her book Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy Culture (Chicago Review Press) is the leading primer on the subject and taught in colleges and universities. Afrofuturism is also a Locus Awards Nonfiction Finalist.

Kemi Layeni

Kemi Layeni is a visual artist, writer, filmmaker and stand-up comic focusing on the stories and experiences of people of African descent. Kemi is a TED Resident in NYC, supported by Adobe Design Achievement, where she worked on projects that used creativity to make an impact. Her TED talk, “The Haunting Landscape of Slavery” is about the pervasive effects of slavery on the modern world – Watch Here. Kemi is also the founder of Blooming while Black. 

Cheyney McKnight

Cheyney McKnight is the founder and owner of Not Your Momma’s History. She acts as an interpreter advocate for interpreters of color at historical sites up and down the east Coast, providing them with much needed on call support.

Cheyney has interpreted 18th, early 19th and mid 19th century slavery as a Living Historian in 26 states, and has worked with over 45 historic sites.  She is an experienced historical interpreter with over 3000 hours of interpretive experience. Cheyney has also crafted and written over 18 tours for sites in Virginia and has written 13 specialized museum programs throughout the East Coast.  She is also an experienced hearth cook and public speaker.

Afrofuturism Celebration Weekend

Friday, Feb. 26 – Sunday, Feb. 28 | 10 AM – 5 PM

Join us for a variety of S.T.E.A.M. based activities, crafts, and programs to celebrate all the amazing Afrofuturism creators who have dared us to dream bigger and the Black environmental and sustainable scientists who were inspired by them! Enjoy discounted admission: $7.57 + tax. Includes access to our new exhibition by National Geographic, Planet or Plastic?

Featured Programming:

  • Participate in our Afrofuturism Community Art piece using upcycled materials
  • Explore Afrofuturism book recommendations from Slover Library (Sat. Feb. 27 only)
  • Make your own art piece inspired by a black scientist or creative using upcycled materials!
  • Flow freely through our museum exhibits; learn about black scientists and creatives.

Let Afrofuturism inspire you to imagine and create a future that is limitless!

Admission $7.57 for Adults & Children.
Nauticus members are free.

Capacity limited to 30% and will be monitored. In support of a touch-free payment process and to guarantee your reservation, online ticket purchases are encouraged. Masks are required for visitors ages 5+.